fdrlibrary
usnatarchives:

Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.
The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 
This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735. 

usnatarchives:

Congress established the Works Progress Administration, a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” on April 8, 1935.

The WPA employed more than 8.5 million persons on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. The Federal Theatre Project was one of the five Federal One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration. The Federal One projects included: the Federal Writers’ Project, the Historical Records Survey, the Federal Theatre Project, Federal Music Project, and the Federal Art Project. The Federal Theatre Project employed out-of-work artists, writers, and directors to entertain poor families and create relevant art. 

This image is from a play produced by the Federal Theater Project entitled “It Can’t Happen Here” in 1935 in New York City. Image: National Archives Identifier 195735. 

congressarchives
ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.
When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  
This week, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.
Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.
Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.
Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.


are you attending the civil rights summit at UT this week?

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.

When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  

This week, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.

Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.

Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.

Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.

are you attending the civil rights summit at UT this week?

congressarchives
congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.
The House and Senate had been in session for two weeks by March 18, 1789, and neither chamber were able to attain a quorum to begin operation of the new government. A week after sending a letter to their absent colleagues, the Senate drafted another letter for distribution. This letter was worded slightly stronger than their initial letter, urging the senators’ immediate attendance. While Congress was not officially able to begin conducting business due to the lack of quorums in both houses, members often gathered together to discuss and prioritize issues that would likely surface in the coming months.
Second Letter to Absent Senators from the Senate, 3/18/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 7726978)

congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

The House and Senate had been in session for two weeks by March 18, 1789, and neither chamber were able to attain a quorum to begin operation of the new government. A week after sending a letter to their absent colleagues, the Senate drafted another letter for distribution. This letter was worded slightly stronger than their initial letter, urging the senators’ immediate attendance. While Congress was not officially able to begin conducting business due to the lack of quorums in both houses, members often gathered together to discuss and prioritize issues that would likely surface in the coming months.

Second Letter to Absent Senators from the Senate, 3/18/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 7726978)

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

Before and After Operation Doorstep

On March 17, 1953 the Federal Civil Defense Administration conducted Operation Doorstep at Yucca Flat, Nevada.  It tested the effects of thermal radiation and nuclear blasts on residential buildings and mannequins such as the model family pictured.

Mannequin Family in a House at Operation Doorstep, 7,500 Feet from the Blast, before the Blast, 03/17/1953

Mannequin Family in a House at Operation Doorstep, 7,500 Feet from the Blast, after the Blast, 03/17/1953

(see also "Operation Cue" conducted in May of 1955.)

don’t sit near the window

sundancearchives
sundancearchives:

It’s St. Patrick’s Day, so it only seems fitting to highlight a few of the many Irish films that have premiered during the Sundance Film Festival.  If you feel inspired, each title is available via iTunes or Netflix.Jim Sheridan’s thematically rich, emotionally textured semi-autobiographical, In America, stars Paddy Considine and Samantha Morton, and premiered during the 2003 Festival. Premiering at the 2007 Festival, John Carney’s Once sports a scrappy, unembellished naturalism - the burdened and brokenhearted Dublin busker and young Czech immigrant’s musical bond is the heart of the film and their love.  John Michael McDonagh’s 2011 debut feature, The Guard, stars Don Cheadle and Brendan Gleeson and transcends the rules of the buddy cop comedy, wryly offering genuine humor and thrills against an unexpectedly moving portrait of its protagonist.Film stills courtesy of Sundance Institute Archives; The Guard still by Jonathan Hession

sundancearchives:

It’s St. Patrick’s Day, so it only seems fitting to highlight a few of the many Irish films that have premiered during the Sundance Film Festival.  If you feel inspired, each title is available via iTunes or Netflix.

Jim Sheridan’s thematically rich, emotionally textured semi-autobiographical, In America, stars Paddy Considine and Samantha Morton, and premiered during the 2003 Festival. Premiering at the 2007 Festival, John Carney’s Once sports a scrappy, unembellished naturalism - the burdened and brokenhearted Dublin busker and young Czech immigrant’s musical bond is the heart of the film and their love.  John Michael McDonagh’s 2011 debut feature, The Guard, stars Don Cheadle and Brendan Gleeson and transcends the rules of the buddy cop comedy, wryly offering genuine humor and thrills against an unexpectedly moving portrait of its protagonist.

Film stills courtesy of Sundance Institute Archives; The Guard still by Jonathan Hession

amnhnyc
amnhnyc:

From the archives: “Plant, bottom of Grand Canyon, Arizona,” (date unknown).
This hand-colored image comes from the American Museum of Natural History’s lantern slide collection, originally used to illustrate public lectures at the Museum. The lectures were so successful that a new and larger theater was constructed in 1900 to accommodate the growing crowds. 
(c) AMNH Library/LS239-58

call me old fashioned, but lantern slides are so lovely!

amnhnyc:

From the archives: “Plant, bottom of Grand Canyon, Arizona,” (date unknown).

This hand-colored image comes from the American Museum of Natural History’s lantern slide collection, originally used to illustrate public lectures at the Museum. The lectures were so successful that a new and larger theater was constructed in 1900 to accommodate the growing crowds. 

(c) AMNH Library/LS239-58

call me old fashioned, but lantern slides are so lovely!